Kenilworth Community Aspirations
  • Last updated:
  • 18 Dec 2015

“Isaac Moore was an adventurous businessman in the 1860s and an innovator in construction and development.  Mr Moore brought cabinetmakers from the Orkney Islands to facilitate the unusual construction method of building Kenilworth Run Homestead out of tongue and groove walls in solid cedar that didn’t require a frame. The community seeks to have such innovation in construction continued in the much need toilet facilities in the parklands by the Mary River.”

“This should be a fitting tribute to the foresight of the Moore family who subdivided Kenilworth Run and established the township precinct.”

“Isaac Moore Park sits on the banks of the Mary River, which for most of the year wends its way through the countryside in a quiet, benign manner.  When the rains come the river becomes a force of nature and all lands along its banks are inundated.”

“In keeping with the originality of thought in the early development of this community it is hoped that the new toilet facility would be beautiful, spectacular, interesting and a dramatic edifice that would be a great addition to the town and the area.”

“There are artists and designers around the area and it is hoped that their ideas will be forthcoming.  To attract a truly wonderful design that will be, in itself, a draw card for visitors, and the competition should be open to everyone.”

“The incorporation of all the required technical aspects of the facility is an essential item in the design, but it is hoped that people with imagination will be able to meet these needs in an exciting design that gives visual pleasure to visitors and locals alike.”

“The community instigated this project and is pleased to partner with Sunshine Coast Council to find a really great idea for an arty toilet in our park.”

“Isaac Moore Park at the entrance to Kenilworth on the Eumundi side of the Mary River Bridge is a pleasant place for travellers to pause for a break before exploring the beautiful hinterland or the Mary Valley. Visitors to the park can shelter in the shade of the trees or under a gazebo, cook lunch on the barbecue and examine the map of the hinterland’s attractions. They can stretch their legs with a walk to the Mary River or throw a ball about – but they can’t go to the toilet!”

“The Kenilworth community believes that visitors to the area should be made welcome and encouraged to spend a bit of time looking around. We live in a beautiful area and people enjoy driving through the bush land, farms along the waterways and through the hills to get to this town. But it is hard to feel welcome when the first stop you make lacks the most basic of facilities for your comfort.”

“When the rain comes though, the Mary can liven up quite dramatically.  At these times, Isaac Moore Park floods. The rules say that if there is to be a toilet, it must be about four metres above the current level of the land and, of course, be accessible to all.”

“No one wants to see an ugly monstrosity in the park that welcomes people to the town. We decided, therefore, to see if it is possible to make the toilet beautiful, perhaps even spectacular.”

“The Kenilworth community has a reputation as a place that fosters the arts and we like the idea of having public art around the area to enhance the experience of both locals and visitors. A beautiful, spectacular, interesting and dramatic edifice would be a great addition to the town and the area.”

“There are artists and designers around the area and we hope to see their ideas. We think, though, that the best way to attract a truly wonderful design that will be, in itself, an attraction for visitors, is to throw the competition open to everyone. There are important requirements that have to be incorporated in any design but we are very keen to see how people with imagination will be able to meet these needs in an exciting design that gives pleasure to visitors and locals alike.”

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