New noteworthy name unveiled at Buderim viewing terrace
  • Friday 20 February 2015
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The popular viewing platform overlooking Martin’s Creek was today officially named in memory of retired Australian Army Officer, Mr Stuart Weir, for his outstanding levels of civic service to the Buderim community.

His widow, Mrs Loloma Weir, who still lives in Buderim, thanked Council for this honour to Stuart Weir.

“In his long army career, Stuart was always on active service – he served in four wars,” she said.

“So it was natural for him to him to continue to be active in his ‘retirement’, and to serve his new community, drawing on his long-established interests in history and gardening.”

Division 7 Councillor Ted Hungerford said he was delighted that a wonderful Buderim asset was officially named ‘Stuart Weir Place’ after a truly inspirational and dedicated Buderim gentleman.

“Stuart’s contribution to the Buderim area was varied and tireless,” Cr Hungerford said.

“Since moving to Buderim with his wife in 1977, he joined the Buderim Historical Society as historical researcher, gardener, painter, handyman, map compiler and author. He also conducted walking tours of Buderim’s historic sites and led bus trips to historic sites in other regions.

“When Stuart died in 2004, his ashes were buried under a frangipani tree in the grounds of Pioneer Cottage, where the fruits of much of the labour of his ‘retirement years’ are evident.”

The name proposal was submitted by the board of Buderim Foundation and received positive endorsement from three significant Buderim community groups – the Buderim Historical Society, the Buderim Foundation and the Chair of the Buderim War Memorial Community Association – and unanimous support from Sunshine Coast Councillors.

President of the Buderim War Memorial Community Association, Simon Whittle said Stuart Weir was a significant and leading contributer to Buderim and its written history and the chosen site for the naming was very fitting.

“Stuart was a modest, quiet achiever who worked tirelessly and very meticulously on various projects to benefit the Buderim community,” he said.

“As well as a remarkable historian, he was a dedicated environmentalist, and the area he was most interested in just happened to be this spot.

“With its location in central Buderim on Lindsay Road and its outlook across the local community, Martin’s Creek viewing terrace could not be more perfect to be named in Stuart’s memory – it all ties in beautifully.

“I appreciate the idea of past significant contributers being recognised in different ways, the more the better, it really adds to the sense of community and history in Buderim.”

Constructed in 2012, the viewing terrace provides the community with a valuable recreation amenity and a tranquil place to enjoy one of Buderim’s best natural assets.

Features of the terrace include a variety of seating opportunities, creek bank rehabilitation, stone clad walls and extensive landscape planting. The Buderim Foundation is currently planning to commission a public artwork for the space.

Mr Stuart Weir – Buderim: life and community
Mr Stuart Weir and his wife moved to Buderim in 1977, where he joined the Buderim Historical Society as historical researcher, gardener, painter, handyman, map complier and author. He also conducted walking tours of Buderim’s historic sites and led bus trips to historic sites in other regions.

In 1983, ’The Year of the Tree’, he identified and listed Buderim’s historic trees, some of which were subsequently listed with the National Trust. In the same year, he compiled maps identifying Buderim’s historic sites - one for self-guided walking tours and another more suited to driving tours. In 1986, he researched the origin of Buderim’s street names, and arranged publication of the booklet ‘Beautiful Buderim’ documenting the origin of the street names, using his own resources. Sales of both maps and the booklet benefited the Historical Society.

His main research work focused on the lives of Buderim’s 19th century pioneers. Drawing on records held at library archives in Brisbane, he compiled comprehensive notes which are now held at Buderim’s Pioneer Cottage as reference material for community use.

While Pioneer Cottage was his main passion, he also loved and took great pride in the beauty of Buderim. When the Maroochy Council initiated a ‘Blot Spots’ project, he worked on identifying and personally cleaning up areas that needed tidying up. He was also very supportive of formative proposals for setting up a Buderim Foundation.

When Stuart died in 2004, his ashes were buried under a frangipani tree in the grounds of Pioneer Cottage, where the fruits of much of the labour of his ‘retirement years’ are evident.