Sunshine Coast cleans up again
  • Friday 23 March 2012

The Sunshine Coast is in cleanup mode again after copping another record rain event.

Local Disaster Coordinator Alan Rogers said council crews were assisting the community with recovery efforts after yesterday’s heavy rainfall that was of similar scale to that which fell over Cooroy in late February.

"This rain event was in excess of a ‘Q100’ which means it was even more severe than a 1 in 100 year rain event," he said.

"Crews from council and the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (QFRS) are conducting assessments of damage as well as the associated business and residential support needs."

Mr Rogers said council would deploy skip bins around the worst affected areas of the Sunshine Coast for residents to dispose of rain affected items.

"We offered this service during the February storm cleanup around Cooroy and Pomona and will offer it again around the hardest hit areas of the region," he said.

Mr Rogers said council crews would also conduct additional cleanups along the route for Sunday’s Mooloolaba Triathlon.

"There is a significant amount of debris strewn from the Mooloola River Bridge down to Wurtulla on the Nicklin Way," he said.

"Street sweepers have been working in this area today and will continue again from midnight tonight in order to ensure that the triathlon course is as safe as possible for competitors on Sunday.

"I understand this is on a residential strip however this weather event requires these additional measures to ensure a thorough cleanup of the area is conducted."

The number for the Queensland State Emergency Service (SES) is 132 500.

The number to call in a life-threatening emergency is triple zero (000).

The number for council's customer service is (07)54757272

Council’s website, Facebook site www.facebook.com/SunshineCoastCouncil is being updated regularly with information about road closures. You can also follow council on Twitter at @CouncilSCC for updates.

Emergency Management Queensland also reminds people to avoid driving, walking or riding through flood waters. Keep clear of creeks and storm drains.